Posts Tagged ‘Oliver Reed’

[PRE-ORDER] KEN RUSSELL † THE DEVILS: Behind the Scenes of a Cursed Movie

From the Aardvark Editions website:

Scandal when Les Diables was released in 1971! The film by British troublemaker Ken Russell, freely inspired by the affair of the possessed women of Loudun which had hit the headlines in France in 1634, gave censors a hard time, stirred up conservative crowds and embarrassed its main investors. In the form of a spirited soap opera where testimonies from the period and unpublished interviews intersect, Richard Crouse looks back on the genesis of this cult film, its extravagant shooting and its eventful exit.
An essential book to immerse yourself in the world of the singular filmmaker Ken Russell and to better understand the mechanisms of censorship and the fascination that Les Diables continues to exert more than fifty years after its production.

At the end of the book, find a long interview with Guillermo del Toro, great laudator of the film and the work of Ken Russell. As well as the press review of the French release to have an overview of the reception of the Devils at home.

Order the French language translation of Richard’s book HERE!

Read more about the Aardvark edition of the book HERE!

Boston Globe: Harvard Film Archive screens Ken Russell’s ‘The Devils’

Screen Shot 2015-03-23 at 12.34.06 PM“… Speaking by phone from Toronto, film critic Richard Crouse, who wrote the 2012 book “Raising Hell: Ken Russell and the Unmaking of the Devils,” said, “It’s a film that is about sex, about religion, about violence, and that corner in which all three of those things intersect. Good does not necessarily triumph over evil, and in that way I think Ken Russell, who was a devout Catholic, presented a story that helped him question his faith, deepen his faith, but also have a long hard look at his faith. And he did it on film, for everyone to see…”

Read the whole Boston Globe article by Ed Symkus HERE!

HELP KEN RUSSELL’S MASTERPIECE GET A BLU RAY RELEASE! #FREETHEDEVILS

From the Facebook page Free Ken Russell’s The DevilsTo answer another question many people have asked; yes, there WILL be a petition to sign. As this campaign is in its early days, I’m still working out the details, but keep your eyes peeled. In the meantime; SHARE, TWEET, BLOG, COMMENT and WRITE. Go to Twitter and tweet #FreeTheDevils

Read Guillermo Del Toro’s fiery plea for this hard-to-see masterpiece’s release on Blu Ray and DVD HERE.

Read about Richard’s book “Raising Hell: Ken Russell and the Unmaking of The Devils” HERE! Buy it HERE!

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GUILLERMO DEL TORO AND RICHARD ON “THE DEVILS” AT TIFF!

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 9.24.10 AMGuillermo del Toro and Richard Crouse appeared at the TIFF Bell Lightbox on Monday November 24, 2014 for an extended introduction and post-screening discussion on Russell’s fevered adaptation of Aldous Huxley’s The Devils of Loudun.

 In 17th-century France, a vain priest (Oliver Reed) becomes the object of a literal witch hunt when a mad nun (Vanessa Redgrave) accuses him of being a sorcerer, in Ken Russell’s fevered adaptation of Aldous Huxley’s The Devils of Loudun.
‡This screening is eligible for our Rush policy. Ticket holders must arrive at least 15 minutes prior to the start of the screening in order to ensure entry. If this event goes Off Sale, tickets will be made available to the Rush line 10 minutes before the start of the screening. MORE INFO HERE!
Thanks to Mark Levy for the photographs!
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Richard talks Ken Russell and “The Devils” on The Projection Booth podcast!

Screen Shot 2014-05-28 at 9.16.11 AMFrom The Projection Booth’s website:

Episode 168: The Devils

Special Guest: Richard CrouseIt’s fun for the whole family as we talk about Ken Russell’s controversial 1971 film “The Devils”. Censored for over 40 years because of content, “The Devils” tells the tale of Urbain Grandier – the priest of Loudun, France who in 1634 was persecuted through an unholy mix of Church, State and Sex.

Joining us is special guest co-host filmmaker Vincenzo Natali.

Our special guest this week is film critic/author Richard Crouse discussing his book “Raising Hell: Ken Russell and the Unmaking of the Devils.”

Metro Canada: Hunger Game’s future after Seymour Hoffman death

hungergamesThe news of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s sudden passing was met with a heartfelt outpouring of grief from fans and those who worked with him.

“Philip Seymour Hoffman was a singular talent and one of the most gifted actors of our generation,” Lionsgate, the studio behind the upcoming Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1  and 2, said in a written statement. “We’re very fortunate that he graced our Hunger Games family. Losing him in his prime is a tragedy, and we send our deepest condolences to Philip’s family.”

Hoffman played head -games-maker-turned-rebel leader Plutarch Heavensbee in the successful series. It is a pivotal role.

In the wake of the actor’s death, questions arose as to whether the uncompleted blockbusters-in-waiting would be completed in time for their scheduled November 21, 2014 for Part 1 and November 20, 2015 for Part 2 release dates.

Hollywood studios have handled the sudden death of  cast members in many different ways. In some cases, films are even abandoned.

Production on Something’s Got to Give was shut down permanently after Marilyn Monroe’s August 1962 barbiturate overdose.

Dark Blood, River Phoenix’s final film, was put into cold storage when the young actor died before filming several crucial scenes. But both movies were eventually resurrected. The documentary Marilyn: The Final Days used footage from Monroe’s aborted film while Dark Blood sat for 19 years before being finished and shown at film festivals.

Father and son Bruce and Brandon Lee both died early, leaving behind unfinished films. The elder martial arts legend had completed 100 minutes of The Game of Death when a cerebral edema took his life.

Even more tragically, Brandon was killed on the set of The Crow in an accident involving a prop handgun.

Both films were salvaged with the use of stand-ins.

When Oliver Reed collapsed of a heart attack at a Malta pub after out-drinking a group of Royal Navy sailors, the editing crew of Gladiator replaced him digitally in the remaining scenes of the film.

More recently, Heath Ledger unexpectedly died during the production of The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus. He was replaced in the surreal story by three actors.

“I just started calling friends of Heath,” director Terry Gilliam said. “It’s as simple as that.”

“Johnny (Depp), Colin (Farrell) and Jude (Law) turned up. It was important that they were friends, because I wanted to keep it in the family. I wanted people who were close to him because, as Colin said when he was doing his part, he was channelling Heath part of the time, so Heath was very much still alive in some sense.

“Contractually, it was supposed to be a Terry Gilliam Film,” said Gilliam. “That’s what the lawyers said, but I said, ‘No way it’s going to be that. It’s going to be a film from Heath Ledger and friends.’ The cast sat around one night and that idea came up and I said, ‘This is it. Perfect. That’s how we do it.’”

As for the upcoming Hunger Games films, reports now confirm that Hoffman completed work on Part 1 and had just seven days left of shooting on Part 2.

His absence will not require any recasting, just a rewrite of one scene. And so Mockingjay Part 2 becomes the final film in Hoffman’s remarkable career.

“Words cannot convey the devastating loss we are all feeling right now. Philip was a wonderful person and an exceptional talent, and our hearts are breaking,” reads a statement released by The Hunger Games author Suzanne Collins, the films’ director Francis Lawrence, producers Nina Jacobson and Jon Kilik and star Jennifer Lawrence.

They are Raising Hell over at “Sophie Cossette Cartoonist Blog”!

Ken-comix-panelWhat did Sophie Cossette Cartoonist Blog have to say about Raising Hell: Ken Russell and the Unmaking of The Devils? Let me tell you…

“… when I came across Toronto writer Richard Crouse’s book from ECW Press about the making of ‘The Devils’, I was in heaven!

Here I could indulge in my guilty pleasure of reading about Ollie‘s bad-boy behavior and find out what went on behind the scenes of my favorite movie of all time. And on top of that, illustrator Ghoulish Gary came up with that extraordinary cover! It can’t get any better, can it? Yes, actually. Crouse’s writing is vividly descriptive, providing the inside scoop on the making of that cursed film. It’s a goddamn great read and if you love ‘The Devils’, get the book now! It beats knitting with nuns any day (unless it’s the nuns from ‘The Devils’ – they’re a fun bunch!) One of the many things I learned from Crouse’s book was that Ken Russell was the first to think of making Anthony Burgess’ 1962 novel on youth ultra-violence, ‘A Clockwork Orange’, into a movie before Stanley Kubrick took on the project. Can you imagine what that film would have looked like had it been made by Russell?!”

Keep your eyes open for Sophie’s upcoming book Sinemania!, where, she says, “her two biggest passions, movies and comics, collide.” It’s a collection of her biographical comic book stories satirically exposing the lives and careers of film directors whose personalities are – or were – particularly over the top. Everyone from Alfred Hitchcock to Roman Polanski by way of… Ken Russell!