Posts Tagged ‘comedy-drama’

YOU TUBE: THREE MOVIES/THIRTY SECONDS! FAST REVIEWS FOR BUSY PEOPLE!

Can Richard Crouse review three movies in just thirty seconds? Have a look as he races against the clock to tell you about the much anticipated “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” the Guillermo Del Toro noir thriller “Nightmare Alley” and the rough and ready drama “Red Rocket” in less time than it takes to fry an egg.

Watch the whole thing HERE!

NEWSTALK 1010: BOOZE AND REVIEWS WITH RICHARD CROUSE ON THE RUSH!

Richard joins Jim Richards and Jay Michaels of the NewsTalk 1010 afternoon show The Rush for Booze and Reviews! Today they play a round of Did Richard Crouse Like These Movies? We have a look at George Washington’s lethal recipe for Eggnog and review the the latest from your friendly neighbourhood crimefighter in“Spider-Man: No Way Home,” the dark carnival of “Nightmare Alley” and the ex-porn star drama “Red Rocket.”

Listen to the whole thing HERE!

RICHARD’S WEEKEND MOVIE REVIEWS FROM CP24! FRIDAY DECEMBER 17, 2021.

Richard joins CP24 to have a look at new movies coming to VOD, streaming services and theatres including “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” the dark carnival of “Nightmare Alley, the ex-porn star drama “Red Rocket” and the animated documentary “Flee.”

Watch the whole thing HERE!

 

RICHARD’S CTV NEWSCHANNEL REVIEWS FOR DEC. 17 WITH ANGIE SETH.

Richard joins CTV NewsChannel and anchor Angie Seth to have a look at new movies coming to VOD, streaming services and theatres including the latest from your friendly neighbourhood crimefighter in “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” the dark carnival of “Nightmare Alley” and the ex-porn star drama “Red Rocket.”

Watch the whole thing HERE!

CFRA IN OTTAWA: THE BILL CARROLL MORNING SHOW MOVIE REVIEWS!

Richard sits in on the CFRA Ottawa morning show with host Bill Carroll to talk the new movies coming to theatres, VOD and streaming services including the latest from your friendly neighbourhood crimefighter in“Spider-Man: No Way Home,” the dark carnival of “Nightmare Alley” and the ex-porn star drama “Red Rocket.”

Listen to the whole thing HERE!

THE SHOWGRAM WITH DAVID COOPER: DOES RICHARD CROUSE LIKE THESE MOVIES?

Richard joins NewsTalk 1010 guest host David Cooper on the coast-to-coast-to-coast late night “Showgram” to play the game “Did Richard Crouse like these movies?” This week we talk about the web slinging action of “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” the noir pleasures of “Nightmare Alley” and the ex-porn star drama “Rede Rocket.”

Listen to the whole thing HERE!

RED ROCKET: 3 STARS. “the grungy flip side of the American Dream.”

Director Sean Baker has made a career of chronicling life on the margins. His lo-fi, low-budget and naturalistic films, “Tangerine” and “The Florida Project,” are about outsiders but never look down on their subjects. His latest, “Red Rocket,” now playing in theatres, continues his trend of neither celebrating or condemning the choices made by his edgy characters.

In “Red Rocket” former MTV DJ Simon Rex is Mikey Saber, a once celebrated porn star whose career in front of the camera is over. Broke, he goes home to Texas City, a dustbowl town he said he’d never step foot in again, yet here he is, crashing at his estranged wife Lexi’s (Bree Elrod) house.

When his porn star past gets in the way of landing a straight job, like working at the local fast-food joints, he makes money selling dime bags. When he meets 17-year-old Strawberry (Suzanna Son), a clerk at the local donut shack, he thinks he’s found his Lolita, a ticket back to the porn biz.

“She’s smoking hot,” he says. “She made the first move. She has no dad, and here’s the kicker, she lets me sell weed to the hard hats at her work. Does it get any better than that?”

“Red Rocket” is a story, loosely told, of the flip side of the American Dream. Saber is a con man, a hustler, all talk, no action (at least outside the sheets). A narcissistic loser, he has ideas but not the wherewithal to see them through and, unfortunately, he drags those around him down on his desperate climb up. Rex makes him compelling, bringing humor and pathos to a complete scumbag.

“Red Rocket” doesn’t feel as tightly constructed as Baker’s other’s films. It shares the same Marlboro-stained soul, but this time around his examination of choices people make simply to survive, flails almost as much as its characters.

THE SHOWGRAM WITH JIM RICHARDS: DOES RICHARD CROUSE LIKE THESE MOVIES?

Richard joins NewsTalk 1010 host Jim Richards on the coast-to-coast-to-coast late night “Showgram” to play the game “Did Richard Crouse like these movies?” This week we talk about to talk about the big screen adaptation of the Broadway hit “Dear Evan Hansen,” the Melissa McCarthy dramedy “The Starling” and the Mark Wahlberg family drama “Joe Bell.”

Listen to the whole thing HERE!

THE STARLING: 2 ½ STARS. “strange mix of heartfelt drama and slapstick comedy.”

There is a scene in “The Starling,” Melissa McCarthy’s maudlin new study of grief and ornithology, where a psychiatrist-turned-vet (that’s the kind of movie this is) tells Lilly (McCarthy), whose husband has spent almost a year in a psychiatric care home, that starlings “are different from other birds. They build a nest together. They’re just not meant to exist in the world alone, on their own.”

“That’s real subtle stuff,” she replies sarcastically but in truth, his remark is subtle compared to the rest of this well-meaning but ham-fisted movie.

Small town supermarket employee Lilly and her school teacher husband Jack (Chris O’Dowd) lives were changed when their baby daughter Kate passed away unexpectedly. Grief strikes each differently. Lilly looks forward, while Jack breaks down and checks into a mental health facility. Left alone, Lilly turns to tending her garden where a rogue starling attacks her every time she ventures outside.

Seeking guidance, she talks to Dr. Larry Fine (Kevin Kline) the psychiatrist-turned-vet reluctantly who councils her on grief and bird problems. As her relationship with the starling changes, so does Jack’s situation with his psychiatrist Dr. Manmohan (Ravi Kapoor) and the couple take steps toward reconciliation.

“The Starling” isn’t the first movie in recent memory to use a bird as a metaphor. “Penguin Bloom” covered similar territory last year and movies like “The Thin Red Line,” “Ladyhawke” and “Black Narcissus” have used birds as an emblem of freedom. It’s too bad that the CGI bird in “The Starling” doesn’t inspire the same kind of sense of wonder as it does in those other movies. As it is, the bird’s flitting and flirting only adds to the muddled feel of the story.

A strange mix of heartfelt drama and slapstick comedy, “The Starling” relies on very likable actors to try and bring a sense of balance to the material but not even McCarthy, Kline and O’Dowd can bend this mishmash of tones into a cohesive whole.